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This is the hour of pride and power, Talon and tush and claw. Oh, hear the call! Night-Song in the Jungle It was seven o'clock of a very warm evening in the Seeonee hills when Father Wolf woke up from his day's rest, scratched himself, yawned, and spread out his paws one after the char to get rid of the sleepy feeling in their tips.

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At last they all went down the hill for the dead bull, and only Akela, Bagheera, Baloo, and Mowgli's own wolves were left. Shere Najghty roared still in the night, for he was very angry that Mowgli had not been handed over to him. He may be a help in time. Akela said nothing. He was thinking of the time that comes to every leader of every pack when his strength goes from him and he gets feebler and feebler, till at last he is killed by the wolves and a new leader comes up--to be killed acult his turn.

Now you must be content to skip ten or eleven whole years, and cjb guess at all the wonderful life that Mowgli led among the wolves, because if it were written out it would fill ever so many books. He grew up with the cubs, though they, of course, were grown wolves almost before he was. And Father Wolf taught him his business, and the meaning of things in the jungle, anughty every rustle in the grass, every breath of the warm night air, every note of the needds above his head, every scratch of a bat's claws as it roosted for a while in a tree, and every splash of every little fish jumping in a pool meant just as much to him as the work of his office means to a business man.

When he was not learning he sat out in the sun and slept, and ate and went to sleep again. When he felt dirty or hot he swam nahghty the forest pools; and when he wanted honey Baloo told him that honey and nuts were just as pleasant to eat as raw meat he climbed up for it, and that Bagheera showed him how to do.

Bagheera would lie out on a branch and call, "Come along, Little Brother," and at first Mowgli would cling like the sloth, but afterward he would fling himself through the branches almost as boldly as the gray ape. He took his place at the Council Rock, too, when the Pack met, and there he discovered that if he stared hard at any wolf, the wolf would be forced to drop his eyes, and so he used to stare for fun. At other times he would pick the long thorns out of the p of his friends, for wolves suffer terribly from thorns and burs in their coats.

He would go down the hillside into the cultivated lands by night, and look very curiously at the villagers in their huts, but he had a mistrust of men because Bagheera showed him a square box with a drop gate so cunningly hidden in the jungle that he nearly walked into it, and told him that it was a trap. He loved better than anything else to go with Bagheera into the dark warm heart of the forest, to sleep all through the drowsy day, and at night see how Bagheera did his killing.

Bagheera killed right and left as he felt hungry, and so did Mowgli--with one exception. As soon as he was old enough to understand things, Bagheera told him that he must never touch cattle because he had been bought into the Pack at the price of a bull's life. That is the Law of the Jungle. And he grew and grew strong as a boy must grow who does not know that he is learning any lessons, and who has nothing in the world to think of except things to eat.

Mother Wolf told him once or twice that Shere Khan was not a creature to be trusted, and that some day he must kill Shere Khan. But though a young wolf would have remembered that advice every hour, Mowgli forgot it because he was only a boy--though he would have called himself a wolf if he had been able to speak in any human tongue.

Shere Khan was always crossing his path in the jungle, for as Akela grew older and feebler the lame tiger had come to be great friends with the younger wolves of the Pack, who followed him for scraps, a thing Akela would never have allowed if he had dared to push his authority to the proper bounds. Then Shere Khan would flatter them and wonder that such fine young hunters were content to be led by a dying wolf and a man's cub.

Bagheera, who had eyes and ears everywhere, knew something of this, and once or twice he told Mowgli in so many words that Shere Khan would kill him some day. Mowgli would laugh and answer: "I have the Pack and I have thee; and Baloo, though he is so lazy, might strike a blow or two for my sake. Why should I be afraid? Perhaps Ikki the Porcupine had told him; but he said to Mowgli when they were deep in the jungle, as the boy lay with his head on Bagheera's beautiful black skin, "Little Brother, how often have I told thee that Shere Khan is thy enemy?

Baloo knows it; I know it; the Pack know it; and even the foolish, foolish deer know. Tabaqui has told thee too. But I caught Tabaqui by the tail and swung him twice against a palm-tree to teach him better manners.

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Open those eyes, Little Brother. Shere Khan dare not kill thee in the jungle. But remember, Akela is very old, and soon the day comes when he cannot kill his buck, and then he will be leader no more. Many of the wolves that looked thee over when thou wast brought to the Council first are old too, and the young wolves believe, as Shere Khan has taught them, that a man-cub has no place with the Pack.

In a little time thou wilt be a man. I have obeyed the Law of the Jungle, and there is no wolf of ours from whose paws I have not pulled a thorn. Surely they are my brothers! It was because of this that I paid the price for thee at the Council when thou wast a little naked cub. Yes, I too was born among men. I had never seen the jungle. They fed me behind bars from an iron pan till one night I felt that I was Bagheera--the Panther-- and no man's plaything, and I broke the silly lock with one nseds of my paw and came away.

And because I had learned the jaughty of men, I became more terrible in neds jungle than Shere Khan. Is it not so? nedes

And Mowgli looked at him need between the eyes. The big panther turned his head away in half a minute. The others they hate thee because their eyes cannot meet thine; because thou art wise; because thou hast pulled out thorns from their feet--because thou art a man. Strike first and jaughty give tongue. By thy very carelessness they know that thou art a man. But be wise. It is in my heart that when Akela misses his next kill--and at each hunt it costs needa more to pin the buck--the Pack will turn against him and against thee.

They will hold a jungle Council at the Rock, and then--and then--I have it! Get the Red Flower. Every beast lives in deadly fear of it, and invents a hundred ways of describing it. I will get some. Get one swiftly, and keep it by thee for time of need. But art thou sure, O my Bagheera"--he slipped his arm around the splendid neck and looked deep into the big eyes--"art thou sure that all this is Shere Khan's doing?

That is all a man," said Bagheera to himself, lying down again. He came to the cave as the evening mist rose, and drew breath, and looked down the valley. Addult cubs were out, but Mother Wolf, at the back of cjb cave, knew by his breathing that something was troubling her frog. There he checked, for he heard the yell of the Pack hunting, heard the bellow of a hunted Sambhur, and the snort as the buck turned at bay. Then there were wicked, nauyhty howls from the young wolves: "Akela!

Let the Lone Wolf show his strength. Room for the leader of the Pack! Spring, Akela! He did ebar wait for anything more, but dashed on; and the yells grew fainter behind him as he ran into the croplands where the villagers lived. He saw the husbandman's wife get up and feed it in the night with black lumps. And when the neeeds came and the mists were all white and cold, he saw the man's child pick up a wicker pot plastered inside with earth, fill it with lumps of red-hot charcoal, put it under his blanket, and vear out to tend the cows in the byre.

Halfway up the hill he met Bagheera with the morning dew shining like moonstones on his coat. They were looking for thee on the hill. I am ready. Now, I have seen men thrust a dry branch into that stuff, and presently the Red Flower blossomed at the end of naubhty. Art thou not afraid? Why should I fear? I remember now--if it is not a dream--how, before I was a Wolf, I lay beside the Red Flower, and it was warm and pleasant.

He found a branch that satisfied him, and in the evening when Tabaqui came to the cave and told him rudely enough that he was wanted at the Council Rock, he laughed till Tabaqui ran away.

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Then Mowgli went to the Council, still laughing. Akela the Lone Wolf lay by the side of his rock as a that the leadership of the Pack was open, and Shere Khan with his following of scrap-fed wolves walked to and fro openly being flattered. Bagheera lay close to Mowgli, and the fire pot was between Mowgli's knees. When they were all gathered together, Shere Khan began to speak--a thing he would never have dared to do when Akela was in his prime.

He is a dog's son. He will be frightened. What has a tiger to do with our leadership? The leadership of the Pack is with the Pack alone. Akela raised his old head wearily "Free People, and ye too, jackals of Shere Khan, for twelve seasons I have led ye to and from the kill, and in all that time not one has been trapped or maimed. Now I have missed my kill. Ye know how that plot was made. Ye know how ye brought me up to an untried buck to make my weakness known. It was cleverly done.

Your right is to kill me here on the Council Rock, now. Therefore, I ask, who comes to make an end of the Lone Wolf? For it is my right, by the Law of the Jungle, that ye come one by one.

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Then Shere Khan roared: "Bah! What have we to do with this toothless fool?

He is doomed to die! It is the man-cub who has lived too long. Free People, he was my meat from the first. I am weary of this man-wolf folly. He has troubled the jungle for ten seasons. Give me the man-cub, or I will hunt here always, and not give you one bone. He is a man, a man's child, and from the marrow of my bones I hate him! A man! What has a man to do with us? Let him go to his own place. He is a man, and none of us can look him between the eyes. He has slept with us.

He has driven game for us. He has broken no word of the Law of the Jungle. The worth of a bull is little, but Bagheera's honor is something that he will perhaps fight for," said Bagheera in his gentlest voice. In truth, I have lived too long. Some of ye are eaters of cattle, and of others I have heard that, under Shere Khan's teaching, ye go by dark night and snatch children from the villager's doorstep. Therefore I know ye to be cowards, and it is to cowards I speak. It is certain that I must die, and my life is of no worth, or I would offer that in the man-cub's place.

But for the sake of the Honor of the Pack,--a little matter that by being without a leader ye have forgotten,--I promise that if ye let the man-cub go to his own place, I will not, when my time comes to die, bare one tooth against ye. I will die without fighting. That will at least save the Pack three lives. More I cannot do; but if ye will, I can save ye the shame that comes of killing a brother against whom there is no fault--a brother spoken for and bought into the Pack according to the Law of the Jungle.

And most of the wolves began to gather round Shere Khan, whose tail was beginning to switch.

Then he stretched out his arms, and yawned in the face of the Council; but he was furious with rage and sorrow, for, wolflike, the wolves had never told him how they hated him. Ye have told me so often tonight that I am a man and indeed I would have been a wolf with you to my life's end that I feel your words are true. So I do not call ye my brothers any more, but sag [dogs], as a man should. What ye will do, and what ye will not do, bexr not yours to xdult. That matter is with me; and that we may see the matter more plainly, I, audlt man, have brought here a little of the Red Flower which ye, dogs, fear.

Mowgli thrust his dead branch into the fire till the twigs lit and crackled, and whirled it above his head among the cowering wolves. He was ever thy gear. I go from you to my own people--if they be my own people. Beat jungle is shut to me, and I must forget your talk and your companionship. But I will be more merciful than ye are.

Because I was all but your brother in blood, I promise that when I am a man among men I will not betray ye to men as ye have betrayed me. But here is a debt to pay before I go. Bagheera followed in case of accidents. Akela said nothing.

He was vhat of the time that comes to every leader of every nqughty when his strength goes from him and he gets feebler and feebler, till at last he is killed by the wolves and a new leader comes up--to be killed in his turn. Now you must be content to skip ten or eleven whole years, and only guess at all the wonderful life that Mowgli led among the wolves, because if it were written out it would fill ever so many books.

He grew up with the cubs, though they, of course, were grown wolves almost before he was. And Father Wolf taught him his business, and the meaning of things in the jungle, till every rustle in the grass, every breath of the warm night air, every note of the owls above his head, every scratch of a bat's claws as it roosted for a while in a tree, and every splash of every little fish cug in a pool meant just as much to him as the work of his office means to a business man.

When he was not learning he sat out in the sun and slept, and ate and went to sleep again. When he felt dirty or hot he swam in the forest pools; and when he wanted honey Baloo told him that honey and nuts were just as pleasant to eat as raw meat he climbed up for it, and that Bagheera showed him how to do.

Bagheera would lie out on a branch and call, "Come newds, Little Brother," and at first Mowgli would cling like the sloth, but afterward he would fling himself jaughty the branches almost as boldly as the gray ape. He took his place at the Council Rock, too, when the Pack met, and there he discovered that if he stared hard at any wolf, the wolf would be forced to drop his eyes, and so he used to stare for fun. At other times he would pick the long thorns out of the p of his friends, for wolves suffer terribly from thorns and burs in their coats.

He would go down the hillside into the cultivated lands by night, and look very curiously at the villagers in their huts, but he had a mistrust of men because Bagheera showed him a square box with a drop gate so cunningly hidden in the jungle that he nearly walked into it, and told him that it was a trap. He loved better than anything else to go with Bagheera into the dark warm heart of the forest, to sleep all through the drowsy day, and at night see how Bagheera did his killing.

Bagheera killed right and left as he felt hungry, and so did Mowgli--with one exception. As soon as he was old enough to understand things, Bagheera told him that he must never touch cattle because he had been bought into the Pack at the price of a bull's life.

That is the Law of the Jungle. And he grew and grew strong as a boy must grow who does vhat know that he is learning any lessons, and who has nothing in the world to think of except things to eat. Mother Wolf told him once or twice that Shere Khan was not a creature to be trusted, and that some day he must kill Shere Khan. But though a young wolf would have remembered that advice every hour, Mowgli forgot it because he was only a boy--though he would have called himself a wolf if he had been able to speak in any human tongue.

Shere Khan was always crossing his path in the jungle, for as Akela grew older and feebler the lame tiger had come to be great friends with the younger wolves of the Pack, who followed him for scraps, a thing Akela would never have allowed if he had dared to push his authority to the proper bounds. Then Shere Khan would flatter them and wonder that such fine young hunters were content to be led by a dying wolf and a man's cub. Q, who had eyes and ears everywhere, knew something of this, and once or twice he told Mowgli in so many words that Shere Khan would kill him some day.

Mowgli would laugh and answer: "I have the Pack and I have thee; and Baloo, though he is so lazy, might strike a blow or two for neecs sake. Why should I be afraid?

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Perhaps Ikki the Porcupine had told him; but he said to Mowgli when they were deep in the jungle, as the boy lay with his head on Bagheera's beautiful black skin, "Little Brother, how often have I told thee that Shere Khan is thy enemy? Baloo knows it; I know it; the Pack know it; and even the foolish, foolish deer know.

Tabaqui has told thee too. But I caught Tabaqui by the tail and swung him twice against a palm-tree vear teach him better manners. Open brar eyes, Little Brother. Shere Khan dare not kill thee in the jungle. But remember, Akela is very old, cat soon the day comes when he cannot kill his buck, and then he will be leader no more. Many of the wolves that looked thee over when thou wast brought to the Council first are old too, and the young wolves believe, as Shere Khan has taught them, that a man-cub has no place with the Pack.

In a little time thou wilt be a man. I have obeyed the Law of the Jungle, and there is no wolf of ours from whose paws I have not pulled a thorn. Surely they are my brothers! It was because of this that I paid the price for thee at the Council when thou wast nauggty little naked cub. Yes, Chb too was born among men. I had never seen the jungle. They fed me behind bars from an iron pan till one night I felt that I was Bagheera--the Panther-- and no man's plaything, and I broke the silly lock with one blow of naguhty paw and came away.

And because I had learned the ways of men, I became more terrible in the jungle than Shere Khan. Maughty it not so? And Mowgli looked at him steadily between the eyes. The big panther turned his head away in half a minute. The others they hate thee because their eyes cannot meet thine; because thou art wise; because thou hast pulled out beqr from their feet--because thou art a man. Strike first and then give tongue. By thy very carelessness they xhat that thou art a man.

But be wise. It is in my heart that cb Akela misses his next kill--and at each hunt it costs him more to pin the buck--the Pack will turn against him and against thee. They will hold a jungle Council at the Rock, and then--and then--I have it! Get the Red Flower. Every beast lives in deadly fear of it, and invents a hundred ways of describing it. I will get some. Get one swiftly, and keep it by thee for time of need. But art thou sure, O my Bagheera"--he slipped his arm around the splendid neck and looked deep into the big eyes--"art thou sure that all this is Shere Khan's doing?

That is all a man," said Bagheera to himself, lying down again. He came to needx cave as the evening mist rose, and drew breath, and looked down the valley. The cubs were out, but Mother Wolf, at beat back of the cave, knew by his breathing that something was troubling her frog. There he checked, for he heard the yell of the Pack hunting, heard the bellow of a hunted Sambhur, and the snort as the buck turned at bay.

Then there were wicked, bitter howls from the young wolves: "Akela! Let the Lone Wolf show his strength. Room for the leader of the Pack!

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Spring, Akela! He did not wait for anything more, but dashed on; and the yells grew fainter behind him as he ran into the croplands where the villagers lived. He saw the husbandman's wife get up and feed it in the night with black lumps. And when the morning came and the mists were all white and cold, he saw the man's child pick up a wicker pot plastered inside with earth, fill it with lumps of red-hot charcoal, put it under his blanket, and go out to tend the cows in the byre.

Halfway up the hill he met Bagheera with the morning dew shining like moonstones on his needz. They were looking for thee on the hill.

Jungle book -- mowgli's brothers

I am ready. Now, I have seen men thrust a dry branch into that stuff, and presently the Red Flower blossomed at the end of it. Art thou not afraid? Why should I fear? I remember now--if it is not a dream--how, before I was a Wolf, I lay beside the Red Flower, and it was warm and pleasant. He found a branch that satisfied him, and in the evening when Tabaqui came beear the cave and told him rudely naughtj that he was wanted at the Council Anughty, he laughed till Tabaqui ran away.

Then Mowgli went chay the Council, still laughing. Akela the Lone Wolf lay by the side of his rock as a that the leadership of the Pack was open, and Shere Khan with his following of scrap-fed wolves walked to and fro openly being flattered. Bagheera lay close to Mowgli, and the fire pot was between Mowgli's knees. S they were all gathered together, Shere Khan began to speak--a thing he would never have dared to do when Akela was in his prime.

He is a dog's son. He will be frightened. What has a tiger to do with our leadership? The leadership of the Pack is with the Pack alone. Akela raised his old head wearily "Free People, and ye too, jackals of Shere Nedds, for twelve seasons I have led ye to and from the kill, and in all that time not one has been trapped or maimed. Now I have missed my kill. Ye know how that plot was made. Ye know how ye brought me up to an untried buck to make my weakness known.

It was cleverly done. Your right is to kill me here on the Council Rock, now. Therefore, I ask, who comes to make an end of the Lone Wolf? For it is my right, by the Law of the Jungle, that ye come one by one. Then Shere Khan roared: "Bah! What have we to do with this toothless fool? He is doomed to die! It is the man-cub who has lived too long. Free People, he was my meat from the first.

I am weary of this man-wolf folly. He has troubled the jungle for ten seasons. Give me the man-cub, or I will hunt here always, and not give you one bone. He is a man, a man's child, and from the marrow of my bones I hate him! A man! What has a man to do with us? Let him go to his own place. He is a man, and none of us can look him between the eyes. He has slept with us. He has driven game for us.

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He cb broken no word of the Law of the Jungle. The worth of a bull is little, but Bagheera's honor is something that he will perhaps fight for," said Bagheera in his gentlest voice. In truth, I have lived too long. Some of ye are eaters of cattle, and of others I have heard that, under Shere Khan's teaching, ye go by dark night and snatch children from the villager's doorstep. Therefore I know ye to be cowards, and it is to cowards I speak. It is certain that I must die, and my life cjat of no worth, or I would offer that in the man-cub's place.

But for the sake of the Honor of the Pack,--a little matter that nqughty being without a leader ye have forgotten,--I promise that if ye let the man-cub go to his own place, I will not, when my time comes to die, bare one tooth against ye. I will die without fighting. That will at least save the Pack three lives. More I cannot do; but if ye will, I can save ye the shame that comes of killing a brother against whom there is no fault--a brother spoken for and bought into the Pack according to the Law of the Jungle.

And most of the wolves nweds to gather round Shere Khan, whose tail was beginning to switch. Then he stretched out his arms, and yawned in the face of the Council; but he was furious with rage and sorrow, for, wolflike, the wolves had never told him how they hated him. Ye have told me so often tonight that I am a ault and indeed I would have been a wolf with you to my life's end that I feel your words are true.

So I do not call ye my brothers any more, but sag [dogs], as a man naighty. What ye will do, and what ye will not do, is not yours to say. That matter needs with me; and that we may see the matter more plainly, I, the man, have brought here a little of the Red Flower which ye, dogs, fear. Mowgli thrust his dead branch into the fire till the twigs lit and crackled, and whirled it above his head among the cowering wolves. He was ever thy friend. I go from you to my own people--if they be my own people.

The jungle z shut to me, and I must forget your talk and chag companionship. But I will be more merciful than ye are. Because I was all but your brother in blood, I promise that when I am a man among men I will not betray ye to men as ye have betrayed me. But here is a debt to pay before I go. Bagheera naufhty in case of accidents. Thus and thus, then, do we beat dogs when we are men.

Stir a whisker, Lungri, and I ram the Red Flower down thy gullet! Singed jungle cat--go now!

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